Carleton's Prize | Lake Champlain

July 02, 2012  •  1 Comment

 

Carleton's Prize, Lake Champlain, VT Working on the water is a challenge with no stabilization. Getting a tack sharp photo may never happen. This summer the SeaDoo has given me access to a new world of photography. The machine runs on 4 inches of water and can go most anyplace. The price of gas is reasonable consider the alternative of fueling a boat. The other great thing is it’s easy to put in the water with one person. Where I live there are five free places to launch it without a fee and there are located in the center of Lake Champlain. Over the last few summers I would get frustrated with the limited locations I could shoot of the Lake from land. I would continually say to myself “If I could only get out over there the shot would be perfect”. The SeaDoo has given me that flexibility to get to the spots I wanted and get some great stuff.

The ability to enjoy the lake from being out there is amazing.  Makes you extra tired and cleanses your body inside and out. The water seems to make me more limber and relaxed too. I could just sit out there for hours and enjoy the view and have waiting for the sun to set. The place you can visit can be a piece of history also like the island called “Carleton’s Prize”. Carleton’s Prize was never in a history lesson in High School or in any family story in my life. Not until I started to shoot it and wanting to climb on it did I discover a sign with a history lesson.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carleton's_Prize

Carleton's Prize is a small rock island in the Vermont waters of Lake Champlain, in Crescent Bay off the southwestern tip of South Hero.

Rising 30 feet (9.1 m) from water's edge to a plateau, situated between Stave and Providence Islands, it has been called Carleton's Prize since the American Revolutionary War when Sir Guy Carleton brought it to notoriety in 1776, the morning after the Battle of Valcour Island.[1]

Local lore has it that it was very foggy on the lake as Benedict Arnold escaped from behind Valcour Island with what was left of his small fleet. Not believing the Americans could have slipped by in the dark (which they had), the British searched to the north and east. In the heavy fog they sighted what they thought was a ship and summarily pounded it with their cannons, smoke from the black powder adding to the lack of visibility.[2]

After up to an hour without return fire, either a breeze came up or the fog burned off, and the British realized they had not been firing on a ship. This distraction allowed Arnold to escape down the lake to Addison, Vermont, where he burned his remaining fleet to prevent capture. Local lore goes further to say that local Islanders had hoisted logs on the island to look like masts. Rust marks from fired cannon shot are still visible on the rock.[3]

Carleton's Prize:
http://ericfitzgerald.zenfolio.com/p46472081

This tiny island is a part of the reason we are a free. Hope you enjoy the history and the photos. Eric
 


Comments

Robert Fitzgerald(non-registered)
Just heard about this spot last week!
Great photos Eric! (as usual)
No comments posted.
Loading...

Archive
January (1) February March April May June (1) July (2) August September October November December (1)
January February March April May June July August September October November (2) December (1)
January (1) February (1) March April May June July August September (1) October (1) November December (1)
January February (1) March April May June (1) July (1) August (1) September October (2) November (1) December
January (1) February March (1) April May June (1) July (2) August September October November (1) December
January (1) February March April May June July August (1) September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December